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Breaking in the core

Airmen from the 18th Component Maintenance Squadron research inspection information March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. After a module has been on an engine for a certain amount of flight-time, that piece must be replaced. When a new part as major as a core engine module is installed, the entire unit goes through tests to “break-in” the new component. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

Airmen from the 18th Component Maintenance Squadron research inspection information March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. After a module has been on an engine for a certain amount of flight-time, that piece must be replaced. When a new part as major as a core engine module is installed, the entire unit goes through tests to “break-in” the new component. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 18th Component Maintenance Squadron research inspection limits March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Ensuring every part of the engine is ready and safe is of the highest priority when it comes to keeping the mission moving. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 18th Component Maintenance Squadron research inspection limits March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Ensuring every part of the engine is ready and safe is of the highest priority when it comes to keeping the mission moving. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Stephen Baudo, 18th Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, checks spacing on an engine blade March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. When installing new cores into an existing unit, the entire engine goes through a rigorous series of checks and tests before being declared mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Stephen Baudo, 18th Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, checks spacing on an engine blade March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. When installing new cores into an existing unit, the entire engine goes through a rigorous series of checks and tests before being declared mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Donovan Walters, 18th Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, checks a valve on a F100/220 engine March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Whenever a new core is installed, the entire unit goes through a “break-in” process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Donovan Walters, 18th Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, checks a valve on a F100/220 engine March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Whenever a new core is installed, the entire unit goes through a “break-in” process. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Donovan Walters, 18th Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, performs an engine test March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Units are tested for a variety of reasons, particularly when major components have been replaced. This testing helps to run new parts through the old system for functionality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Donovan Walters, 18th Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, performs an engine test March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Units are tested for a variety of reasons, particularly when major components have been replaced. This testing helps to run new parts through the old system for functionality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Stephen Baudo, 18th Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, walks toward a F100/220 engine March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Engines are tested in a building specially designed to reduce the noise produced during testing by utilizing thick walls and advanced architecture. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Stephen Baudo, 18th Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, walks toward a F100/220 engine March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Engines are tested in a building specially designed to reduce the noise produced during testing by utilizing thick walls and advanced architecture. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- Airmen from the 18th Component Maintenance Squadron research inspection information March 10, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. After a module has been on an engine for a certain amount of flight-time, that piece must be replaced. When a new part as major as a core engine module is installed, the entire unit goes through tests to “break-in” the new component. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Quay Drawdy)