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Kadena's communication assistants

CCCE

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Rachel Holmes and Tech. Sgt. Robert Martin, 18th Wing Command Chief Executive Assistants, pose for a photo April 19, 2018 at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The executive assistant also facilitates recognition of Airmen through quarterly and annual awards, Senior Airman Below the Zone, and the Airman of the Week program. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

CCCE

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Rachel Holmes, 18th Wing Command Chief Executive Assistant, poses for a photo April 19, 2018 at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The executive assistant position is a 1-year commitment, and is selected by the Command Chief during an application and interview process. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

CCCE

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Robert Martin, 18th Wing Command Chief Executive Assistant, poses for a photo April 19, 2018 at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The executive relays information between the Command Chief and unit leaders across Kadena. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- Balancing a busy schedule is asked of anyone who puts on the uniform, but that schedule only gets busier as Airmen progress in rank. Once they've achieved a position at the base leadership level, they need another set of eyes to help manage their schedule ‒ making sure their time is spent efficiently for the benefit of the base, and the Air Force.

Keeping the schedule free of conflicts for the top enlisted member at Kadena may be considered a fairly large task, and the team that handles the task is made up of just two Airmen ‒ the Command Chief's Executive Assistants.

"The Command Chief's Executive Assistant is an integral part of the command staff and ensures all correspondence is in regulation and processed efficiently," said Tech. Sgt. Rachel Holmes, 18th Wing CCCE. "This office supports and relays the direction of the 18th Wing Command Chief through communication with unit leaders across the base."

While one may not find executive assistant on the job sheet at the local recruiter's office, it's a necessary position to keep the mission going, especially at a high-paced base such as Kadena. Whether it's the Airmen and their families, the sister services on the base or other countries who need the ear of base leadership, the executive assistants are there to make sure the requests are racked-and-stacked in importance so the CCC can execute their mission.

"The Command Chief's Executive Assistant manages and de-conflicts the Command Chief's daily agenda and business travel, supporting bilateral and multilateral engagement requests," said Tech. Sgt. Robert Martin, 18th Wing CCCE. "We also have a large role in Air Force-level processes like the Developmental Special Duty vectoring and Joint Professional Military Education opportunities."

The position is unique in the fact that any Air Force Specialty Code can apply, Homes explained. It's a one-year commitment and is applied for at the unit-level. The CCC conducts interviews and selects the best Airmen to join the command team.

While the CCCE's main priority is handling the schedule for the CCC, they're also responsible for functions that affect Airmen throughout the base, including many additional programs highlighting outstanding Airmen. They facilitate the recognition of deserving Airmen through quarterly and annual awards, Senior Airman Below the Zone, and Airmen of the Week, Martin explained.

With multiple hats worn at times, the CCCE's explain the best part of their job is seeing the relationship between leadership on base and those serving under them. At the end of the day, taking care of leadership is the CCCE's main priority, but taking care of the Airmen and helping them be rewarded for their hard work may be the best pay-off for the demanding position.

"Our job is rewarding because we are able to witness the authentic appreciation this leadership team has for every single service member and civilian on Kadena Air Base," Holmes said.