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USAF Surgeon General in China: ‘We have empowered our youngest Airmen to solve problems’

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, addresses the audience at the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange (APMHE) 2018, in Xi’an, China Sept. 18, 2018.

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, addresses the audience at the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange (APMHE) 2018, in Xi’an, China Sept. 18, 2018. The APMHE emphasizes a cooperative approach, providing the U.S. military the opportunity to engage with allied, partner, and regional militaries. More than 600 attendees from 30 nations and international organizations are participating in this year’s annual event, now in its fourth year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Phil Ventura)

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, answers a question from an attendee at the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange (APMHE) 2018, in Xi’an, China Sept. 17, 2018.

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, answers a question from an attendee at the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange (APMHE) 2018, in Xi’an, China Sept. 17, 2018. The APMHE emphasizes a cooperative approach, providing the U.S. military the opportunity to engage with allied, partner, and regional militaries. More than 600 attendees from 30 nations and international organizations are participating in this annual event, now in its fourth year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Phil Ventura)

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, delivers a presentation titled 'Leveraging Change Management to Steer the Air Force Medical Service Toward Zero Harm,' to a multinational audience of medical professionals at the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange (APMHE) 2018, in Xi'an, China Sept. 18, 2018.

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, delivers a presentation titled 'Leveraging Change Management to Steer the Air Force Medical Service Toward Zero Harm,' to a multinational audience of medical professionals at the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange (APMHE) 2018, in Xi'an, China Sept. 18, 2018. Subject matter exchanges, like the week-long APMHE, are based on common goals that provide a benefit to the security of participating nations by increasing regional stability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Phil Ventura)

Lieutenant General Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, engages with attendees at the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange 2018 Sept. 18, 2018, after delivering a presentation and answering questions on leveraging change management to improve results in military medical care.

Lieutenant General Dorothy Hogg, U.S. Air Force Surgeon General, engages with attendees at the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange 2018 Sept. 18, 2018, after delivering a presentation and answering questions on leveraging change management to improve results in military medical care. Now in its fourth year, the APMHE 2018 is being held in Xi’an, China, and is co-hosted by U.S. Indo-Pacific Command Surgeon’s Office and the People’s Republic of China, People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Directorate of Medical Services. (U.S. Air Force photo by Maj. Phil Ventura)

Xi’an, China --

The U.S. Air Force Surgeon General addressed a multinational audience of medical professionals here Sept. 18, 2018 as part of the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange (APMHE) 18.

 

Lt. Gen. Dorothy Hogg’s presentation, ‘Leveraging Change Management to Steer the Air Force Medical Service Towards Zero Harm,’ was part of an overall discussion on performance optimization.

 

“Trusted care is a single-minded focus of continually improving the delivery of safe, quality health care with zero harm,” Hogg said. “It is a culture that is always learning and improving through continuous process improvement to identify errors before they reach our patients.”

 

In her remarks, the general acknowledged that while delivering quality health care has always been the goal of the U.S. Air Force Medical Service, research has found that the same errors often re-occur; an issue that’s not exclusive to military medicine.

 

“If human errors were a disease, it would be the third leading cause of death in America,” Hogg said.

 

The week-long APMHE, attended by more than 600 participants from 30 countries and international organizations, offers a range of workshop sessions designed to foster candid discussion in pursuit of the exchange’s theme, ‘Challenges & Solutions: Strengthening Global Health.’

 

Having identified the challenge for the U.S. Air Force, Hogg went on to describe a solution.

 

“All of our Airmen have a duty to speak up for safety – this is integrity,” Hogg said, linking the service’s approach to care with its core values. “All of our Airmen are committed to putting safety first – service before self. And all Airmen must remain steadfast in striving to zero harm – excellence in all we do.”

 

Hogg also fielded a range of questions from fellow exchange attendees.

 

“Every Airman, every day, is a problem-solver,” Hogg said, when asked about the U.S. Air Force medical community’s transformation, “We have empowered our youngest Airmen to identify gaps, seams, problems, issues and bring them up.”

 

Now in its fourth year, APMHE 18 is co-hosted by U.S. Indo-Pacific Command Surgeon’s Office and the People’s Republic of China, People’s Liberation Army Directorate of Medical Services. The event was founded by the United States and previous co-hosts include: Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore.