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Rain or shine, Weather Flight keeps Kadena ready

The 18th OSS weather flight prepares Kadena Air Base in the case of any weather condition.

U.S. Air Force Capt. Veronica Arnold, left, 18th Operations Support Squadron weather flight commander, and Senior Airman Jeffery Hess, right, 18th Operations Support Squadron weather journeyman, work side by side at Kadena Air Base, Japan, July 27, 2021. As the largest U.S. Air Force combat wing in operation, Kadena maintains air supremacy using aircraft from F-15C Eagle fighter jets to HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters. A thorough weather analysis must be conducted before aircraft of any kind can depart, making the weather flight crucial to mission success. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anna Nolte)

The 18th OSS weather flight prepares Kadena Air Base in the case of any weather condition.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jeffery Hess, 18th Operations Support Squadron weather journeyman, uses a kestrel meter to observe weather conditions at Kadena Air Base, Japan, July 27, 2021. If airfield sensors break, being able to take a manual weather observation is vital to providing an accurate weather product. Weather flight forecasters are imbedded in squadrons with flying operations to deliver weather analysis that is tailored to that squadron’s specific mission and aircraft requirements. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anna Nolte)

The 18th OSS weather flight prepares Kadena Air Base in the case of any weather condition.

U.S. Air Force Capt. Veronica Arnold, right, 18th Operations Support Squadron weather flight commander, discusses data findings with Tech. Sgt. Cassandra Lane, left, 18th OSS weather craftsman, at Kadena Air Base, Japan, July 27, 2021. With weather impacting nearly every aspect of base operations, the weather flight is responsible for briefing five-day weather outlooks to the 18th Wing’s leadership. This information ensures Kadena continues functioning as a world-class strategic forward base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anna Nolte)

The 18th OSS weather flight prepares Kadena Air Base in the case of any weather condition.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Cassandra Lane, 18th Operations Support Squadron weather craftsman, studies weather conditions data at Kadena Air Base, Japan, July 27, 2021. The weather flight not only forecasts the weather for Kadena but also localized weather conditions. The terminal aerodrome forecast predicts the weather conditions of the airfield up to 30 hours ahead. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anna Nolte)

The 18th OSS weather flight prepares Kadena Air Base in the case of any weather condition.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Cassandra Lane, 18th Operations Support Squadron weather craftsman examines weather data for a tropical storm at Kadena Air Base, Japan, July 27, 2021. Weather models are becoming more accurate as technology advances, but weather predictions still require human analysis to be reliable. Forecasters often confirm the weather model matches the conditions outside through manual observation and they use their training on the dynamics of atmospheric conditions to verify the data is accurate. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anna Nolte)

The 18th OSS weather flight prepares Kadena Air Base in the case of any weather condition.

U.S. Air Force Capt. Veronica Arnold, 18th Operations Support Squadron weather flight commander, relays information during a phone call at Kadena Air Base, Japan, July 27, 2021. Part of the weather flight’s mission is resource protection, which verifies weather conditions meet the criteria to issue weather watches, warnings and advisories. The island of Okinawa lacks a National Weather Service, meaning the forecasts of the weather flight are vital for Kadena’s mission success. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Anna Nolte)

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan --