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NDI energizes Kadena

Portrait of a nondestructive inspection technician with a face shield on.

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, wears personal protective equipment prior to performing a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. Nondestructive inspection specialists ensure aircraft safety and readiness by using magnetic particles, fluorescent penetrants and eddy currents to detect cracks in aircraft parts that may be invisible to the naked eye.Whitney enjoys the scientific processes involved in his career field and overcoming challenges that he faces as an NDI technician. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

Technician applies liquid magnetic particles to a boom fork shaft.

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, applies liquid magnetic particles to a boom fork shaft during a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. Once energized, the liquid magnetic particles will be attracted to any cracks on the part. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

Technician cleans a boom fork shaft

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, cleans a boom fork shaft prior to performing a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. A magnetic particle inspection is a nondestructive method used to reveal surface and near surface discontinuities in magnetic materials. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

Technician energizes a boom fork shaft.

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, energizes a boom fork shaft during a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. The magnetic particle inspection is the method of choice on magnetic materials instead of liquid penetrant because it is faster and requires less surface preparation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

Technician energizes a magnetic machine.

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, energizes a magnetic machine during a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. The keys to a successful magnetic particle inspection are the correct amount of magnetization of the part, adequate contrast between the part’s surface and the particles used to identify the flaw. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

Technician applies liquid magnetic particles to a boom fork shaft.

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, sprays liquid magnetic particles to a boom fork shaft during a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. Nondestructive inspection specialists ensure aircraft safety and readiness by using magnetic particles, fluorescent penetrants and eddy currents to detect cracks in aircraft parts that may be invisible to the naked eye. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

Technician inspects a boom fork shaft.

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, inspects a boom fork shaft during a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. After an NDI technician detects an imperfection, other maintenance personnel such as the metals technology and aircraft structural maintenance flights have the ability to manufacture and repair parts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

Technician holds a boom fork shaft under a black light.

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, shines a black light on a boom fork shaft during a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. The fluorescent color comes from suspended iron particles that glow while under a black light. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

Technician holds a field test indicator next to a boom fork shaft.

Airman 1st Class Kaleb Whitney, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, holds a field test indicator next to a boom fork shaft after performing a magnetic particle inspection at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 8, 2021. Nondestructive inspection technicians use field test indicators to make sure parts are properly magnetized and demagnetized before and after performing an inspection. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Yosselin Perla)

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan --