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Kadena Airman gets married by long distance

2nd Lt. Asim Khan, 18th Communications Squadron, recites traditional Islamic wedding vows along with an Imam,religious leader, over the internet, Aug. 4 in Okinawa. Lieutenant Khan officially married his wife, Sadaf, while she was in Pakistan and are planning to have a formal wedding in December. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Reynaldo Ramon)

2nd Lt. Asim Khan, 18th Communications Squadron, recites traditional Islamic wedding vows along with an Imam,religious leader, over the internet, Aug. 4 in Okinawa. Lieutenant Khan officially married his wife, Sadaf, while she was in Pakistan and are planning to have a formal wedding in December. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Reynaldo Ramon)

2nd Lt. Asim Khan, 18th Communications Squadron, smiles at his wife, Sadaf, after their wedding ceremony over the internet, Aug. 4. Lieutenant Khan officially married Sadaf while she was in Pakistan and are planning to have a formal wedding in December.
(U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Reynaldo Ramon)

2nd Lt. Asim Khan, 18th Communications Squadron, smiles at his wife, Sadaf, after their wedding ceremony over the internet, Aug. 4. Lieutenant Khan officially married Sadaf while she was in Pakistan and are planning to have a formal wedding in December. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Reynaldo Ramon)

2nd Lt. Asim Khan, 18th Communications Squadron, bottom left of screen, asks the family members to sit his wife, Sadaf, in front of the camera after their wedding ceremony over the internet, Aug. 4. Lieutenant Khan officially married Sadaf while she was in Pakistan and he was here.  They are planning to have a formal wedding in December.
(U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Reynaldo Ramon)

2nd Lt. Asim Khan, 18th Communications Squadron, bottom left of screen, asks the family members to sit his wife, Sadaf, in front of the camera after their wedding ceremony over the internet, Aug. 4. Lieutenant Khan officially married Sadaf while she was in Pakistan and he was here. They are planning to have a formal wedding in December. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Reynaldo Ramon)

2nd Lt. Asim Khan, 18th Communications Squadron, looks at his wife, Sadaf, during a conversation following their wedding ceremony over the internet, Aug. 4. Lt. Khan officially married Sadaf while she was in Pakistan and he was here in Okinawa.  They plan to have a formal wedding in December.
(U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Reynaldo Ramon)

2nd Lt. Asim Khan, 18th Communications Squadron, looks at his wife, Sadaf, during a conversation following their wedding ceremony over the internet, Aug. 4. Lt. Khan officially married Sadaf while she was in Pakistan and he was here in Okinawa. They plan to have a formal wedding in December. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Reynaldo Ramon)

KADENA AB, Japan -- The Nikah--a marriage contract--can be seen in the background on a computer monitor as an Islamic religious leader steps into view and begins a ceremony uniting an 18th Communication Squadron officer here in Okinawa with his bride in Pakistan. 

Dating was never an issue for the couple that met 15 years earlier and kept in touch recently via e-mail, text messaging and phone calls. 

"We live in awesome times and should take advantage of technology," said 2nd Lieutenant Asim Khan, Kadena Network Control Center crew commander, of his Internet wedding Aug. 4. 

The decision to get married over the Internet was made by Asim's mother, said Sadaf, new wife of Lieutenant Khan. The couple met at an American school in Lahore, Pakistan in 1992. Fifteen years later they picked up where they left off after being reintroduced by their families through e-mail. 

"It took about an hour until we got over the initial hurdle during our first long distance conversation," said Lieutenant Khan. "It was really strange, I'm not going to lie." 

They had a candlelight dinner at a French restaurant in Buse Center in Okinawa, July 6. 

"That is when I proposed to her," said Lieutenant Khan. "Yet it wasn't official." 

In God's eyes now we will not be living in sin since we got married, he said. 

"Culture may be subjective, but in Islam this is an accepted form of getting married," said Lieutenant Khan. 

After the engagement in Okinawa, Sadaf left for Pakistan to prepare for the wedding. They agreed video teleconferencing would be the best way to marry along with witnesses at both ends. 

Lieutenant Khan said he couldn't make it to Pakistan because of duties and leave situations. 

"We were given plenty of support from our parents, grandparents, and the rest of the family members," said Lieutenant Khan. 

Their marriage was destined to unify their two families. Both grandfathers came from the same village in India and migrated to Pakistan, then split up. 

"When my grandfather found out who she was, he was very happy," said Lieutenant Khan. 

The lieutenant said he and his new bride are "extremely compatible." Part of that can be attributed to their similar culture. 

"Our culture is family oriented," he said. "I love it that way." 

Lt. Khan misses the culture of his former homeland. Him and Sadaf are now living together in Okinawa and will fly to Pakistan in December to have the formal wedding.