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Shock to the system

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Matthew Abel, 18th Security Forces Squadron defender, fires on a target while Senior Airman Trent Jones, 18th SFS trainer, evaluates his performance during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC)  spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Each member had to fire on two targets as part of the qualification process. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Matthew Abel, 18th Security Forces Squadron defender, fires on a target while Senior Airman Trent Jones, 18th SFS trainer, evaluates his performance during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Each member had to fire on two targets as part of the qualification process. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Antonio Lim, 18th Security Forces Squadron defender, receives instructions on how to remove the Taser points from the target during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC)  spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Removing the points requires careful precision as they can get stuck into the target and require surgery to remove. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Antonio Lim, 18th Security Forces Squadron defender, receives instructions on how to remove the Taser points from the target during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Removing the points requires careful precision as they can get stuck into the target and require surgery to remove. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jamsen Hayden, 18th Security Forces Squadron defender, lays down for a demonstration of the ‘ride the lightning’ during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC)  spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Defenders were able to choose what position they preferred to be in for this portion, including laying down, or having the clips attached to their abdomen, calves, or standing up. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jamsen Hayden, 18th Security Forces Squadron defender, lays down for a demonstration of the ‘ride the lightning’ during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. Defenders were able to choose what position they preferred to be in for this portion, including laying down, or having the clips attached to their abdomen, calves, or standing up. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Felicity Walker, 18th Security Forces Squadron trainer, test sprays the OC spray for demonstration during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC)  spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The OC spray is similar to pepper spray, and induces a burning sensation to the affected region of the body. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Felicity Walker, 18th Security Forces Squadron trainer, test sprays the OC spray for demonstration during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The OC spray is similar to pepper spray, and induces a burning sensation to the affected region of the body. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Luis Bernal, 18th Security Forces Squadron defender, is OC sprayed in the face during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC)  spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan.  The OC spray, similar to pepper spray, is comparable in heat to hot peppers such as the Cayenne pepper and the Carolina Reaper.  (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Luis Bernal, 18th Security Forces Squadron defender, is OC sprayed in the face during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The OC spray, similar to pepper spray, is comparable in heat to hot peppers such as the Cayenne pepper and the Carolina Reaper. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Vanessa Nava, 18th Security Forces defender, is asked to say how many fingers she can see during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC)  spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The OC spray causes a temporary blindness that helps assist in apprehension. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Vanessa Nava, 18th Security Forces defender, is asked to say how many fingers she can see during Taser and oleoresin capsicum (OC) spray training July 20, 2017, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. The OC spray causes a temporary blindness that helps assist in apprehension. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Greg Erwin)

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- “So tell me your name and where you’re from,” says Senior Airman Trent Jones, 18th Security Forces Squadron trainer, to a defender preparing for the jolt from 50,000 volts of electricity during the Taser and oleroresin capsicum (OC) spray training held July 20, 2017.   

As the defender starts to answer, Jones pulled the trigger on the Taser,  and the defender is helped to the floor by fellow Airmen.  Every inch of the man’s body is paralyzed from the shock and he is unable to move.  Once the Taser has stopped sending electricity through his body, he is able to stand again and verbally explains the pain. 

“Before your stint in Security Forces is over, you are going to get OC sprayed,” said Jones. “You’re going to get that exposure because you carry it, and you need to be ready to react if you are in that line of fire.”  

The training prepared defenders on the use of two non-lethal combatives they rely on to keep Team Kadena safe.  A total of seven defenders completed the Taser portion, and another seven defenders completed the OC  spray training portion of the day, which entailed running through an obstacle course while overcoming the effects of the spray, similar in nature to pepper spray, on their vision.  

In the past six months Jones has sprayed and tased  more than 350 students.

In order to carry a Taser and OC spray while on duty, every defender must attend and pass the course.

“We can’t just let anyone arm up and use Taser or OC spray,” said Jones.  “We’re never going to just throw somebody right into the fire.  We’ll give them the slides, show them how to work it, and give them videos for training.”

The first part of the training involved a PowerPoint slideshow and instruction, practical training without the cartridges, target training with cartridges, and finally a ‘ride the lightning’ portion where defenders experienced Taser shocks firsthand.

Once the Taser portion was complete, the defenders moved outside for the OC spray portion. The students were sprayed in the face with the OC and while experiencing the effects of the spray, the defenders competed in an obstacle course to show they can still do their job even in the event that their spray has been used against them.   

“It’s been over an hour, and I can still barely open my eyes,” said Airman 1st Class Vanessa Nava, 18th SFS defender. “Initially, I didn’t feel anything until I took that first blink.  That’s the most painful feeling.  It just felt hot and burning.”

Each defender has two minutes or less to complete the obstacle course in order to pass.  On this day, every defender completed both tasks and were certified.  The training conducted here is another way members of the 18th Security Forces Squadron prepare to keep Team Kadena safe and secure, both on and off base.