HomeNewsArticle Display

ArticleCS - Article View

Civil Engineers train to prevent fuel spills

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kyle Rollins, 18th Civil Engineer Squadron assistant chief of operations, gives a safety brief during a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. This exercise gave Airmen the opportunity to hone emergency response and informed base leadership on the importance of developing and implementing a solid fuel spill prevention plan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Kyle Rollins, 18th Civil Engineer Squadron assistant chief of operations, gives a safety brief during a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. This exercise gave Airmen the opportunity to hone emergency response and informed base leadership on the importance of developing and implementing a solid fuel spill prevention plan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

A member of Japan Air Self Defense Force, 9th Air Wing Base Supply Squadron, equips a level-A suit during a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. The 18th Logistics Readiness Squadron commander invited more than 10 JASDF members from the 9th AW to observe the U.S. Armed Forces methods responding simulated fuel spill. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

A member of Japan Air Self Defense Force, 9th Air Wing Base Supply Squadron, equips a level-A suit during a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. The 18th Logistics Readiness Squadron commander invited more than 10 JASDF members from the 9th AW to observe the U.S. Armed Forces methods responding simulated fuel spill. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

Airmen from the 18th Civil Engineer Squadron participated in a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. More than 50 Kadena Airmen were tested on how to handle real-world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

Airmen from the 18th Civil Engineer Squadron participated in a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. More than 50 Kadena Airmen were tested on how to handle real-world contingencies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

Airmen from the 18th Aerospace Medicine Squadron participated in a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. During an exercise scenario, responders used the Airman's Manual, which helped them find the proper procedures to respond to the situation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

Airmen from the 18th Aerospace Medicine Squadron participated in a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. During an exercise scenario, responders used the Airman's Manual, which helped them find the proper procedures to respond to the situation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

U.S. Air Force Airman Georgia Knight, 18th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering technician, assists an Airman into a level-A suit during a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. The level-A suit is the highest level protection against vapors, gases, mists and particles, which consists of a fully encapsulating chemical entry suit with a self-contained breathing apparatus. It’s protects Airmen from hazardous material and harmful environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

U.S. Air Force Airman Georgia Knight, 18th Aerospace Medicine Squadron bioenvironmental engineering technician, assists an Airman into a level-A suit during a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. The level-A suit is the highest level protection against vapors, gases, mists and particles, which consists of a fully encapsulating chemical entry suit with a self-contained breathing apparatus. It’s protects Airmen from hazardous material and harmful environments. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

Kadena firefighters from the 18th Civil Engineer Squadron check a multiRAE device during a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. The multiRAE is the most advanced portable chemical detector with the flexibility of up to six gas sensors and the convenience of wireless portability. This multi-gas monitor is versatile and customizable, while delivering real-time access to instrument readings and alarm status from any location. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

Kadena firefighters from the 18th Civil Engineer Squadron check a multiRAE device during a fuel spill exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. The multiRAE is the most advanced portable chemical detector with the flexibility of up to six gas sensors and the convenience of wireless portability. This multi-gas monitor is versatile and customizable, while delivering real-time access to instrument readings and alarm status from any location. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

The 18th Civil Engineer Squadron simulated a fuel spill of more than 1,000 gallons during an exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. The purpose of this exercise was to train base personnel on fuel spill prevention and containment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

The 18th Civil Engineer Squadron simulated a fuel spill of more than 1,000 gallons during an exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Oct. 25, 2019. The purpose of this exercise was to train base personnel on fuel spill prevention and containment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Naoto Anazawa)

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan --