HomeNewsArticle Display

Display

SERE teach Combat Survival Training

SERE teaches Combat Survival Training course

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Kenji Scouton, NCO in charge of survival, evasion, resistance and escape operations from the 18th Operational Support Squadron, teaches a group of aircrew members about land navigation during a combat survival training course at Kadena Air Base, Japan, March 18, 2021. During the lecture, aircrew members learned various SERE methods in order to be rescued successfully. The CST is a refresher course that needs to be taken by aircrew members every three years to maintain proficiency for their mission qualification training. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Cesar J. Navarro)

SERE teaches Combat Survival Training course

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Casey Carter and U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Kenji Scouton, NCOs in charge of survival, evasion, resistance and escape training and operations with the 18th Operational Support Squadron, dress up as enemy combatants for a training scenario at Kadena Air Base, Japan, March 18, 2021. The change from instructors to enemies takes place right after the lecture on combat survival training. The SERE instructors themselves go through a longer and more in-depth process while at SERE technical school. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Cesar J. Navarro)

SERE teaches Combat Survival Training course

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Casey Carter, NCO in charge of survival, evasion, resistance and escape training with the 18th Operational Support Squadron, aims his flashlight at the back of the van filled with aircrew members during a combat survival training course at Kadena Air Base, Japan, March 18, 2021. Aircrew members are driven around aimlessly in order to disorient them while they’re blinded by hoods. The instructors pause the exercise every now and then to relay instruction and remind aircrew members what the next portion of the exercise is meant to simulate. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Cesar J. Navarro)

SERE teaches Combat Survival Training course

U.S. Air Force aircrew members change out of their uniforms in the dark during a combat survival training course at Kadena Air Base, Japan, March 18, 2021. Aircrew members disguise themselves using blending techniques taught to them by the survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialists. The instructors drive by in a van a few times prompting aircrew members to change in a gutter in order to avoid detection. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Cesar J. Navarro)

SERE teaches Combat Survival Training course

A U.S. Air Force aircrew member uses a combat survivor evader locator radio during a combat survival training course at Kadena Air Base, Japan, March 18, 2021. The CSEL radio is used to make contact with the instructors who transition their roles from enemies to personnel recovery support, relaying further instructions on what to do in order to get rescued. The radio is found at a hidden location along with a cache of clothes and other items. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Cesar J. Navarro)

SERE teaches Combat Survival Training course

A U.S. Air Force aircrew member uses a compass to navigate during a combat survival training course at Kadena Air Base, Japan, March 18, 2021. Instructors teach students how to use many instruments they might have available in a real-world scenario. The knowledge of how to use a compass or radio can mean the difference between life or death in some events. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Cesar J. Navarro)

SERE teaches Combat Survival Training course

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Casey Carter, NCO in charge of survival, evasion, resistance and escape training with the 18th Operational Support Squadron, plays the role of a personnel recovery asset, simulating a recovery during a combat survival training course at Kadena Air Base, Japan, March 18, 2021. Isolated personnel are given a set of instructions on a place, time and action they’re supposed to take in order to get in contact with a PR asset. Real-world execution of this can be difficult due to limited information and uncontrolled events, so aircrew members are told that if two of the three criteria are met and they don’t have reservations about the scenario, they should proceed with caution and make contact with a PR asset. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Cesar J. Navarro)

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan --