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Airmen teach welding to wing leadership

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, performs a metal inert gas welding technique on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. During his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, Airmen taught the commander how to do specific welding techniques. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would always boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, performs a metal inert gas welding technique on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. During his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, Airmen taught the commander how to do specific welding techniques. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would always boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, welds two pieces of stainless steel together during his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. Welding is a fabrication or sculptural process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence. This is often done by melting the materials and adding a filler to form a pool of molten material that cools to become a strong joint. Pressure is sometimes used in conjunction with heat to produce the weld. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, welds two pieces of stainless steel together during his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. Welding is a fabrication or sculptural process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence. This is often done by melting the materials and adding a filler to form a pool of molten material that cools to become a strong joint. Pressure is sometimes used in conjunction with heat to produce the weld. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, practices a metal inert gas welding technique on training materials on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. During his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, Airmen taught the commander how to do specific welding techniques. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would always boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, practices a metal inert gas welding technique on training materials on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. During his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, Airmen taught the commander how to do specific welding techniques. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would always boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Justin Costanzo, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology craftsman, shows Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, how to use the pedestal grinder on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. The pedestal grinder is a grinder mounted on a pedestal that is bolted to the floor. Pedestal grinders are commonly used to hand grind cutting tools and to perform other rough grinding tasks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Justin Costanzo, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology craftsman, shows Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, how to use the pedestal grinder on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. The pedestal grinder is a grinder mounted on a pedestal that is bolted to the floor. Pedestal grinders are commonly used to hand grind cutting tools and to perform other rough grinding tasks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Christopher Zampese, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, presents Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, with an example of a well done tungsten-electrode inert gas welding technique on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. TIG is a slower welding technique, but the quality of weld tends to be cosmetically better because there is no weld splatter and it has a clean finish, according to Senior Master Sgt. Roger Starcher, 18th EMS Fabrication Flight superintendant. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Christopher Zampese, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology technician, presents Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, with an example of a well done tungsten-electrode inert gas welding technique on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. TIG is a slower welding technique, but the quality of weld tends to be cosmetically better because there is no weld splatter and it has a clean finish, according to Senior Master Sgt. Roger Starcher, 18th EMS Fabrication Flight superintendant. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, performs a tungsten-electrode inert gas welding technique on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. TIG is a slower welding technique, but the quality of weld tends to be cosmetically better because there is no weld spatter and it has a clean finish, according to Senior Master Sgt. Roger Starcher, 18th EMS Fabrication Flight superintendant. During his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, Airmen taught the commander how to do specific welding techniques. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would always boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, performs a tungsten-electrode inert gas welding technique on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. TIG is a slower welding technique, but the quality of weld tends to be cosmetically better because there is no weld spatter and it has a clean finish, according to Senior Master Sgt. Roger Starcher, 18th EMS Fabrication Flight superintendant. During his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, Airmen taught the commander how to do specific welding techniques. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would always boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Justin Costanzo, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology craftsman, talks with Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, on the different welding techniques that they will be performing on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Justin Costanzo, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology craftsman, talks with Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, on the different welding techniques that they will be performing on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, listens while Staff Sgt. Justin Costanzo, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology craftsman, gives him tips and advice while he practices his tungsten-electrode inert gas welding technique on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. TIG welding is the process of blending together reactive metals such as magnesium and aluminum. During his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, Airmen taught the commander how to do specific welding techniques. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would always boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)

U.S. Air Force Col. Brian McDaniel, 18th Wing vice commander, listens while Staff Sgt. Justin Costanzo, 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology craftsman, gives him tips and advice while he practices his tungsten-electrode inert gas welding technique on Kadena Air Base, Japan, Dec. 6, 2012. TIG welding is the process of blending together reactive metals such as magnesium and aluminum. During his visit to the 18th Equipment Maintenance Squadron, Airmen taught the commander how to do specific welding techniques. McDaniel said he wanted to learn how to weld because his father used to weld and would always boast about how good he was, so he wanted to try it out himself to show that he could do it too. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Justin Veazie)