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Kadena member recognized for significant support of Energy Action Month

Small energy-saving personal habits such as turning off lights and powering down office equipment when not in use at Joint Base Andrews have produced big financial savings for the Air Force, and ultimately, the American public. In fiscal year 2012, the installation achieved direct energy and water/sewer cost savings of approximately $3,164,020.27 as compared to fiscal 2011.

The Air Force is the largest consumer of energy in the U.S. federal government, but it is also the number two purchaser of green power in the federal government. Aviation fuel accounts for more than 80 percent of energy used by the Air Force annually, but it is the 20 percent that every Airman can do something about.

KADENA AIR BASE, Japan -- October is Energy Action Month, and this year's theme of "I am Air Force Energy" is being exemplified by members across Team Kadena.

Jay Fountain, 18th Force Support Squadron services maintenance and construction team chief, supported the Air Force's energy-saving initiative by eliminating significant waste of air-conditioning at the Kadena Officer's Club.

He received an 18th Wing 2013 Shogun Energy Warrior Certificate in recognition of his hard work.

Due to Fountain's efforts, the Kadena O-Club eliminated nearly $4,000 from yearly power spending by adding inner sets of doors on the two main entrances, causing the environmental system there to work more efficiently.

"We added the doors to make [the O-Club] a better atmosphere and also to save energy," Fountain said.

He hasn't stopped there to save energy, though.

"At the Kadena Marina Seaside Inn, we lowered the ceiling, which is a big thing because it doesn't use as much electricity for the air conditioning," Fountain said. "Almost everything we do saves money somewhere: electricity, air conditioning, something like that. Because when we remodel something, we put in new energy-efficient [features]. A perfect example is Chili's; the outside lights used to be neon and now they are LED."

Energy efficiency improvements reduce operating costs and increase available funds for essential Air Force recapitalization and modernization efforts.

Savings from the O-Club's power bill can be used for other FSS projects, such as Okuma's Turtle's Nest cabins, and the seven new cabins that will be built there soon. Golf course upgrades, club renovations and Kadena's bowling center remodeling were also projects that were paid with funds that didn't have to go to power bills.

The Air Force is the largest consumer of energy in the U.S. federal government, but it is also the number two purchaser of green power in the federal government. Aviation fuel accounts for more than 80 percent of energy used by the Air Force annually, but it is the 20 percent that every Airman can do something about.

"During fiscal 2012, the Air Force pocketed more than $1.5 billion in savings through the use of smarter building materials, new technologies and more efficient flight operations," said Eric Fanning, Acting Secretary of the Air Force. "This shrewd use of energy brought a 21 percent reduction in installation electricity intensity and transported 37 percent more cargo per gallon of fuel. In short, the smart use of energy means flying our aircraft farther, transporting more cargo, and accomplishing our mission in a more efficient and effective way."

Airmen play a key role in achieving energy goals and the Air Force is committed to fostering an energy aware culture.